University at Buffalo
Department of

Art

Art & Design

Art History

Visual Studies

Flatbed Scanner Instructions

Flatbed Scanners Instructions

 

Epson Expression Flatbed – Image Capture Software

This Epson scanner is an extremely popular scanner for digital archiving.

Best for one-off image digitization. Scans images up to 11” X 17”.

Scanning speed: 1 image/3 minutes; 10 images/1 hour.

 

1. Turn on scanner and wait for it to fully boot. Then open Image Capture software (not the Epson Scan software).

 

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2. Select “Kind” of scan as “Color,” “Black & White,” or “Text.”

 

Simply put, “Color” is for color images (select “Millions” for the “Colors” drop down menu below “Kind”) and is the most useful. Even when an image looks black and white, often times it is best to be safe and select “Color.”

 

“Black & White” is for black and white images (select “256 Grays” in “Grays” drop down menu).

 

“Text” is just for text; it is best used for scanning books.

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3. Select “Resolution.” Most often, this field should be set to “400 dpi” the breakdown for quality is as follows:

 

Newspaper/Pulp Books:            200 dpi

Normal scan/If unsure:            400 dpi

Beautiful High Resolution:            600 dpi

 

Anything more than 600 dpi should really be done with the copy stand.

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NOTE: At the end of these instructions is a helpful guide for resolution that Jeff has put together.

 

4. Now file type, save location, and file name must be selected. “Scan To” sets where the scan will be saved, “Name” gives the file its name, and “Format” is the file type. All of these fields are contingent upon the use of the image scanned. Oftentimes, if working on a larger project, it is wisest to save to a file of the project number and name the image its number in the project sequence. (See above image for the location of these fields.)

 

5. Click “Overview” at the bottom of the right side menu to get a preview of the scan.

 

6. Size the frame around the image that you would like to scan (leaving a small boarder of white space around it).

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7. Click “Scan.” It may take a few moments to scan, depending on the resolution selected.

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8. Adjust the scanned image in Photoshop as needed. Such adjustments include inserting a black boundary, straightening the image, cropping it, color restoration, and (light) use of the healing brush.

 

PHOTOSHOP NOTE: For a more detailed account, see the “Copy Stand—Camera Control Pro 2 Instructions.”

 

9. Do not forget to turn off the scanner after use.

 

 

Microtek ArtixScan M1 Flatbed Scanner – SilverFast Software

SilverFast is the most popular scanning program for digitization in higher education. This scanner is better for longer projects. Scans images up to 8.5” X 14”.

 

1. Turn on scanner and wait for it to fully boot. The software will not open if the scanner is off.

 

2. Start SilverFast: “SF Universal Launcher”.

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3. Click center button to launch SilverFast with the Microtek flatbed: “SilverFast (MicrotekSDK)”.

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4. Place book/magazine/work in scanner. Attempt to cover as much of the glass as possible with either the rest of the book or a thick sheet of paper. Full coverage will provide a higher quality scan.

 

5. Now that the program is open, look to the large settings box on the left that says “SilverFast Ai studio.” Before scanning anything, select “General” menu and in the “Original” field select “Reflective,” not “Transparency.”

 

Reflective” activates the flatbed scanner.

Transparency” activates the slide scanner.

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6. Select the “Frame” menu and click “Prescan” to get an initial scan of your work.

 

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So now you will have a scanned image to work with:

 

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7. Now select the appropriate settings for the scan. First is the resolution, which depends on what is being scanned and for what use. The appropriate DPI settings are listed below. Never set the DPI higher than 1200 as it will take FOREVER to scan and the file will be unspeakably large.

Resolutions:

Newspaper/Pulp Books:            200 dpi

Normal scan/If unsure:            400 dpi

Beautiful High Resolution:            600 dpi

Original Drawings:            1200 dpi

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NOTE: At the end of these instructions is a helpful guide for resolution that Jeff has put together.

 

8. If necessary, rotate the image so that it faces right side up. To rotate, use the buttons on the toolbar found on the left side of the scanned image. Only use the Rotate 90° button; never use the Horizontal/Vertical Rotate button as this will make a mirror flip of the image.

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9. Reset the values using the button to the left of “Prescan” on the left menu box.

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10. Resize the image by first using the mouse to tightly frame the image you wish to scan using the adjustable red frame in the prescan. Next zoom in on the selected image by clicking the Zoom button in the menu box (the magnifying glass). The scanner will now produce a new, tighter prescan.

 

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11. Select the “Scan Type.” For color images use “48 Bit Color” and for black and white use “16 Bit Grayscale.” Only use one of these two. More often than not, the image will actually be color, even if it looks black and white, so go with “48 Bit Color” if you are unsure. This setting must be done before any Histogram adjustments.

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12. Adjust the brightness levels in the Histogram. Click the Histogram button in the left menu box. In the Histogram pop up, adjust the “Shadow” and “Highlight” levels by moving the limits on either side of the graph: left adjusts the shadow, right adjusts the highlight. Play with them to get a feel. Always adjust a little less than what you think looks good to make sure the integrity of the image is not compromised.

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13. Select the number of passes the scanner will make to composite into a single quality scan. To do this, simply click the MultiScan button on the left-side tool bar on the scanned image. For a standard scan, select 2 scans. For a quality scan, select 4 scans.

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14. Name the file. If scanning an image for the database, use the accession number.

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15. Scan and save the file. Save to the Macintosh HD. If scanning multiple images, make a new folder for the project. If this project is for the database, name the folder the project code. Scanning can take a very long time with this machine, so have some patience.

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16. Adjust the scanned image in Photoshop as needed. Such adjustments include inserting a black boundary, straightening the image, cropping it, color restoration, and (light) use of the healing brush.

 

PHOTOSHOP NOTE: For a more detailed account, see the “Basic Photoshop Instructions.”

 

17. Do not forget to turn off the scanner after exiting SilverFast.

POST SCRIPT: You can select more than one frame at a time to scan. You can adjust the original red frame around one image on a page and, simply using your mouse, click and drag a new frame over another image. Each of these frames may be given separate names and have different resolutions. This ability can save some time if scanning multiple images at once—two photographs, for instance.

UB DEPARTMENT OF ART
202 Center for the Arts, North Campus
Buffalo, New York 14260-6010
(716) 645-6878
(716) 645-6970 fax
art-info@buffalo.edu